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Strong Kids Healthy Kids

All parents want their children to be healthy, fit, and more active, but there is a pervasive myth that keeps many kids from reaching their full potential. A popular misconception is that young athletes shouldn’t engage in strength training because it is harmful. However, current research, including a recent study from the Mayo Clinic, indicates that nothing could be further from the truth. Strength training is the single most effective exercise method for reversing adolescent obesity and can dramatically alter and improve a child's body composition.

With his blockbuster book The Slow Burn™ Fitness Revolution , renowned personal trainer Fredrick Hahn revealed the secret to strengthening muscles, enhancing flexibility, burning fat and improving performance in just 30 minutes a week. Now, in Strong Kids, Healthy Kids, he shows parents, caregivers, teachers, and doctors how his fitness program can change the lives of children and teens everywhere, no matter what their athletic ability. Whether a child is inactive or a competitive athlete looking to take his performance to the next level, he can become much stronger and fitter. As the founder of the Mighty Tykes and Teens™ program, Hahn is an expert on child fitness.

With this proven program, all children can build their self-esteem, improve their performance, and lead healthier lives.

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The Slow Burn Fitness Revolution

Personal trainer Hahn and his physician co-writers, who previously authored the bestselling Protein Power, purport to have discovered the secret to strengthening heart and bones, enhancing flexibility, burning fat and improving athletic performance. This "revolutionary method of strength training that far exceeds the benefits of almost any other kind of exercise" is the Slow Burn-a "tough but short" workout consisting of measured lifting of heavy weights to the point of complete muscle exhaustion. For those with access to gym equipment, the weight should be "so heavy that for the first second or two you feel like you won't be able to budge it" (readers sans gym memberships work with their body weight and a few small free weights). Before describing any Slow Burn exercises, however, the authors spend 70-odd pages trying to debunk most common assumptions regarding exercise and diet. Not all exercise is beneficial, they argue, and some exercise can be downright harmful (jogging, the authors insist, causes, "bad knees, damaged hips, and weak backs"). Similarly, the old dictate "eat less, exercise more" is not the simple weight loss solution it seems, and the book provides all sorts of evidence to explain why (the pages are liberally sprinkled with footnotes and scientific terminology).This book seems more like a good argument for strength training than it does a full-blown revolution, but the exercises are easy to follow and should improve fitness when practiced appropriately.

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